Dedicated Out of Hours Care for your pet
Covering South Wales   Cardiff, 180 Merthyr Road (A470), CF14 1DL 02920 529 446   Ystrad Mynach, Oakfield Street, CF82 7AF 01443 811 111

Help

General Advice

  • Keep calm.
  • Contact us as soon as possible, appraise us of the situation and get first aid advice.
  • Keep your pet warm, as quiet as possible, and keep movement to a minimum if there is possible injury, e.g. broken limbs, back, etc.
  • Transport your pet to us as soon as possible but drive carefully and observe speed limits.
  • If your pet is small enough, try to transport in a suitable container such as a strong cardboard box. If it is a large dog, try to use a blanket or thick towel on which it can be rolled and then lifted by one or more people assisting. Improvised stretchers using boards, doors etc. should be used with care – the recumbent patient can sometimes ‘come to’ and jump off and sustain further injuries.

Does my pet need to be seen?

Please click here for our Symptom Checker

How do I contact the Emergency Clinic?

Simply ring your usual vet. After routine surgery hours, you may be transferred directly through to one of our Emergency Clinics, or an answer phone will give you the number of it.
Alternatively, phone (Cardiff) 02920 529446 or (Ystrad Mynach) 01443 811111

Can I ring for advice?

If you have a concern regarding your pet, please phone us and we will advise as to whether or not your pet should be seen. It can be very difficult to give any firm advice without seeing your pet.

What do I do if my pet needs to be seen?

Phone us first, and then transport your pet to the nearest V.E.T.S. clinic. The staff will be waiting to receive your pet and administer appropriate treatment.

How do I get to the V.E.T.S. Clinic?

The clinics are centrally located, to facilitate convenient access from a wide area. They have good car parking facilities and are sign-posted prominently.
Please click here for full directions to our two clinics.

What if I don’t have transport?

If you are unable to transport your pet to us, we have full ambulance facilities.

What if I am unable to move my pet?

V.E.T.S. operates just like a human casualty unit. All the necessary lifesaving facilities are located there, and, just as human emergencies are transported to the casualty unit, so must pets be taken to V.E.T.S. Very little useful treatment can be carried out elsewhere. The staff at V.E.T.S. will give advice on how to move injured pets.

Will I need to leave my pet?

If the condition is serious and requires emergency medical or surgical care, then your pet will be admitted for immediate treatment.

When my pet has recovered, can I take him/her back to my usual vet?

Of course. Once the emergency is dealt with, and the patient stabilised, V.E.T.S. will automatically contact your usual vet. All your pets’ records will be available to your own vet on-line (including radiographs and lab results)to enable them to continue any further treatment. If the pet is left at the clinic, it will be returned to your usual vet as soon as possible in normal hours.

What if my pet is already receiving treatment? Will V.E.T.S. have access to his/her records?

Again, just as with you or I, the majority of emergencies, such as road traffic accidents, do not require case records. If your pet is receiving medication, the V.E.T.S. staff will probably ask you to bring it with you.

How much does it cost?

A detailed estimate will be given by our staff. Credit and swipe cards are acceptable. Payment is made to V.E.T.S., not to your usual vet. Pet insurance covers these fees. For basic fees please click here. For unbiased, independent advice about pet insurance, please click here.

Can anyone use V.E.T.S.?

Participating practises subsidise the basic fee. Non-participating vets should provide their own cover and you will be redirected to them. However, if you cannot contact them we will of course see your pet, although the fees may not be subsidised

I fear that my pet may need to be put to sleep. What should I do?

Click here for further information on this delicate subject.

do you have advice on breeding?

Breeding Problems in Dogs
Breeding Problems in Cats